Things I Have Seen in Places I Have Been

Some pictures, some photography, and some memories

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Hi everyone,I published my first book about a month ago. Its title is Neuroeconomics: an Applied Information Theory, and it describes a new theory that is meant to bridge the gap between neuroscience and modern psychology.From the book jacket:"Over the last 30 years, advances in our technology and in our understanding of the scientific disciplines which those technologies enable have allowed humanity to glimpse the inner workings of some of our most astounding capacities, and have revealed, to even a casual glance, the staggering complexity of even our most casual functions. This progress means that the very nature of psychology is evolving, and with these discoveries have come both new questions and new opportunities to revisit some of the oldest: “What are we made of?”, “How do we work?”, “What makes us tick?”A large number of the currently held explanations for some of these most central psychological questions are beginning to crumble under the weight of new evidence, and greater and greater proportions of our ever-growing knowledge remain unaccounted for and unexplained.Neuroeconomics is the culmination of more than four years of independent research in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, physiology, primatology, biology, and chemistry, and it follows in a long tradition of works that have faced similar problems by introducing a new theory that can comprehensively resolve this central academic dilemma.”This book is available for free download at my website (www.dthornebooks.com), and I’d love it if you checked it out.Cheers:)

Hi everyone,

I published my first book about a month ago. Its title is Neuroeconomics: an Applied Information Theory, and it describes a new theory that is meant to bridge the gap between neuroscience and modern psychology.

From the book jacket:

"Over the last 30 years, advances in our technology and in our understanding of the scientific disciplines which those technologies enable have allowed humanity to glimpse the inner workings of some of our most astounding capacities, and have revealed, to even a casual glance, the staggering complexity of even our most casual functions. This progress means that the very nature of psychology is evolving, and with these discoveries have come both new questions and new opportunities to revisit some of the oldest: “What are we made of?”, “How do we work?”, “What makes us tick?”

A large number of the currently held explanations for some of these most central psychological questions are beginning to crumble under the weight of new evidence, and greater and greater proportions of our ever-growing knowledge remain unaccounted for and unexplained.

Neuroeconomics is the culmination of more than four years of independent research in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, physiology, primatology, biology, and chemistry, and it follows in a long tradition of works that have faced similar problems by introducing a new theory that can comprehensively resolve this central academic dilemma.”

This book is available for free download at my website (www.dthornebooks.com), and I’d love it if you checked it out.

Cheers
:)

Filed under neuroscience psychology brain mind neuropsychology book books science

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fishesnstuff:

noussommesou:

Just a sunny day in the fishtank.

29 gal., freshwater
bamboo/grass + peace lily
buenos aires tetras
dwarf gouramis
bosemani’s rainbowfish (male & female)
blind cave tetra
danio
channel catfish

I live natural light on tanks!
What camera did you use?

Just my trusty Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT.  It’s practically a dinosaur cause I got it in around 2005 but we’ve been through a lot together. :)